walkydeads:

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

And no lie literally EVERYTHING in Beaufort is named after him.

walkydeads:

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.

This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

And no lie literally EVERYTHING in Beaufort is named after him.

35 minutes ago with 37,308 notes — via cottoncandypink, © didyouknowblog.com



Orange Is The New Black cast attends the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards

1 hour ago with 9,982 notes — via neotropicalia, © cophines



"I remember Axl asking me if I thought that Appetite For Destruction would actually sell. I told him that, despite the fact that it was nothing like what was on the radio, I thought it would go gold (500 000 US sales). I was only off by twenty million records.

- Michael Barbiero about Appetite For Destruction, the biggest-selling debut album of all time and 18x Platinum in the US, 28 million sales worldwide.

1 hour ago with 1,192 notes — via queerhawkeye, © bisoukawaii



"Any time bombs are used to target civilians it is an act of terror."
— President Obama said this last year. Embarrassingly enough, he pretty much called himself a terrorist along with his government. Just a simple look into America’s current drone strikes shows that hundreds of civilians have been killed. (via disciplesofmalcolm)
2 hours ago with 813 notes — via stillcanttimetravel, © antiwar.com




Pretty in Pink (1986)

Pretty in Pink (1986)

3 hours ago with 3,456 notes — via vintagegal



afrikanattire:

Launched last month, Wafrica — Africa plus wa for Japan — has unveiled a range of kimono handcrafted in an array of African cotton fabrics that would seem to be a million miles from the subtle silks more commonly associated with traditional Japanese dress. Yet despite the orange comets and flashes of lightning tearing across a moss-green background, and the tribal swirls in colors that recall the sun-drenched African soil, the prints blend seamlessly into the kimono form before they surprise Japanese shoppers with their foreign origin.

The cultural cocktail is the brainchild of Serge Mouangue, a Tokyo-based concept- car designer for Nissan, who joined forces with Kururi, a Tokyo-based kimono- maker, to produce the traditional Japanese attire in 18 African prints sourced in markets from Nigeria to Senegal.

[source]

Serge Mouange introduces the WAfrica concept and kimono (Fashion show)

Le kimono Africain: Serge Mouangue TED talks

3 hours ago with 4,662 notes — via stillcanttimetravel, © afrikanattire



stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani (x)

4 hours ago with 900 notes — via stand-up-comic-gifs
#lol



ladiesofthe70s:

Goldie Hawn (1974)

ladiesofthe70s:

Goldie Hawn (1974)

4 hours ago with 427 notes — via missavagardner, © ladiesofthe70s






sixpenceee:

HOW THE MOKIN CHILDREN ARE ABLE TO SEE WITH AMAZING CLARITY UNDERWATER

The Mokin are a group in Thailand that are nomadic and have a sea-based culture. 

In the sea there is less light, so usually one’s iris will dilate. But the Mokin have an adaption where instead of dilating, they constrict as much as possible. 

This allows them to see with much better clarity. Recent studies suggest that any child can quickly learn this trick. It exemplifies how well our brain adapts to our environment. 

SOURCE 

You may also like: SWIMMING BABIES

6 hours ago with 34,006 notes — via stillcanttimetravel, © sixpenceee



Today at my grad school orientation
  • Icebreaker leader: Ok, the next trivia question is open ended. Your group has 10 minutes to list as many Harry Potter characters as you can.
  • Me: MY TIME HAS COME.
6 hours ago with 1,258 notes — via heyteenbookshey, © literatebitch



carfaycor:

craftbeerlibrary:

How California deals with earthquakes. 6.0 this morning in Napa. (Photo credit: Jeremy Carroll)


#i feel like this picture is the embodiment of california at its most california (via billymermays)

carfaycor:

craftbeerlibrary:

How California deals with earthquakes. 6.0 this morning in Napa. (Photo credit: Jeremy Carroll)

7 hours ago with 93,693 notes — via stillcanttimetravel, © craftbeerlibrary



"That’s right kids Jesse Pinkman lived, Dexter lived, but your Mother didn’t make it. Sleep tight."
— Seth Meyers on ‘HIMYM’
7 hours ago with 2,599 notes — via micdotcom



siddharthasmama:

fiftyshadesofmacygray:

whatisthat-velvet:

#rp #dontshoot

Okay, this is really important.

this is much needed right now in the midst of everything else we’ve been doing in solidarity for mike - let’s not forget how Black, disabled folks are also targets, especially those with autism, due to behaviors cops love to read as “aggressive”, on top of their racism.

siddharthasmama:

fiftyshadesofmacygray:

whatisthat-velvet:

#rp #dontshoot

Okay, this is really important.

this is much needed right now in the midst of everything else we’ve been doing in solidarity for mike - let’s not forget how Black, disabled folks are also targets, especially those with autism, due to behaviors cops love to read as “aggressive”, on top of their racism.




"We had comedies that made you laugh and comedies that made you cry because they were dramas submitted as comedies."
— Seth Meyers
17 hours ago with 1,349 notes — via micdotcom